Bohol earthquake not well publicized as island needs aid

This is the Chocolate Hills observatory on top of one of the hills. Needless to say it would have been tough to survive or at least not get seriously injured when the earthquake struck.

This is the Chocolate Hills observatory on top of one of the hills. On the right is myself in March, 2013. Needless to say it would have been tough to survive or at least not get seriously injured when the earthquake struck on Oct.15.

Not too many people know about Bohol, Philippines. It’s an island in the centre of the country and was recently destroyed by a 7.2-magnitude earthquake, which killed about 200 people and will cost tens of millions of US dollars to rebuild. The media attention was fleeting in Canada and on CNN. According to the UN the country needs $58 million to recover as more than 300,000 people require basic amenities.

A lot of famous landmarks I visited there have been destroyed, namely the Chocolate Hills, a remarkable range of once perfectly spherical mounds that go as far as the eye can see.

The beaches are stunning and the people were incredibly hospitable.

Bohol is known as one of the last habitats of the tarsier primate, the smallest in the world. It’s an amazing little creature.

Bohol is also famous within the country for whale sharks and it’s becoming more popular for tourists to go on whale shark tours. The practice of feeding the animals in the wild is questionable but it beats having them hunted as they were decades ago.

Apparently, after the earthquake scientists discovered a new fault system which has caused a miles long crack in the earth.

Here are some images of Bohol before the quake in March, 2013: